Prize recipients

2008 – Dr. Denis Mukwege

The Olof Palme Prize 2008 is awarded to Dr. Denis Mukwege for his work for peace and human rights in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), one of the world's most conflict ridden countries. In a region where man's most brutal sides are shown in the violence against women and its proportions have reached unimaginable levels, Dr. Denis Mukwege has made it his life work to unceasingly fight in the opposite direction. The Panzi Hospital, founded and headed by Dr. Mukwege, serves peace, understanding and solidarity in a way worthy of imitation through the work with the women who are the most exposed victims of this conflict.
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2007 – Parvin Ardalan

The Olof Palme Prize for 2007 goes to Parvin Ardalan, who has succeeded in making the demand for equal rights for men and women a central part of the struggle for democracy in Iran. As a result, the women’s movement for civil rights and liberties has, to a great extent, spread geographically as well as socially. Despite persecution, threats and harassment, Parvin Ardaln has been persistent in her struggle and never compromised her ideals.
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2005 – Daw Aung San Suu Kyi

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi for her unyielding fight for a democratic Burma. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is an outstanding example of the efforts to attain democracy by the people of Burma, where respect for human rights, ethnic unity, and a life in peace remain only a dream. To her compatriots she is known as the ’Iron Butterfly’, a name alluding both to her peaceful struggle and her courage and strength of character.
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2004 – Ljudmila Aleksejeva, Sergej Kovaljov, Anna Politkovskaja

The Olof Palme Prize 2004 is awarded to three Russian advocates of human rights. Respect for human rights in Russia is of major importance for safety and stability in the rest of the world. The three prize winners are all influential symbols of the long battle for human rights in Russia. With their great courage, often matched with considerable personal sacrifice, risk-taking and dogged insistence in never compromising the fundamental ideals of strengthening free speech and a free press, they thereby represent those who have influenced and promoted democratic development in the country.
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2003 – Hans Blix

For his work against the spread of weapons of mass destruction, and for common security on the basis of international law. He has under circumstances of strong external pressure demonstrated an independence and a commitment to principle which have inspired respect and admiration throughout the world.
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2002 – Hanan Ashrawi

For her consistent and fearless fight over the years for her people’s independence and dignity. Her work for human rights and co-existence with the state of Israel has won respect in all camps. She is a leading force in the struggle for increased openness and democratic structures within her own Palestinian ranks. Hanan Ahrawi is an inspiring symbol of a new, democratic, peaceful Middle East.
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2001 – Fazle Hasan Abed

The Olof Palme Prize 2001 is awarded to Fazle Hasan Abed for his pioneering work in combating poverty and empowering the poor, especially women. This has been done by initiating and developing BRAC, (Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee), into one of the worlds largest NGOs.
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2000 – Bryan Stevenson

Bryan Stevenson who has for many years worked intensively, in his daily actions, for the abolition of the death penalty. Bryan Stevenson is a courageous representative of all the individuals, women and men from the entire world, who have maintained tirelessly that the right to life cannot be controverted, that the death penalty is an ultimate form of torture, and that the state does not have the right to kill its citizens.
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